Origami, Art of folding papers

There can hardly be a western person who didn’t, as a child, make a paper airplane using folded newspaper or a sheet from a notebook. The more adventurous might have made a hat or, if they were lucky, might have been introduced to the almost limitless possibilities that origami and a creative mind can conjour up. These days, while some people consider it a real art form that is very Zen-like in its simplicity and depth, origami is regarded mainly as an activity for children, who are taught just a few standard designs. Even in Japan, the most complicated design that most people master is the tsuru (crane), which has developed into a worldwide symbol of children’s desire for peace. Please take square paper and try!

 It is good exercise for brains as a same time, preventions of Alzheimer. so lots of japanese kindergarden and older peoples house have a time for Origami too.

 

つる Crain

papercranes

Like many things in Japanese culture, origami (from “oru” meaning to fold, and “kami” meaning paper) has its origins in China. It is believed that paper was first made, and folded, in China in the first or second century. The earliest records of origami in Japan date to the Heian Period (794-1185). It was during this period that Japan’s nobility had its golden age and it was a time of great artistic and cultural advances. Paper was still a rare enough comodity that origami was a pastime for the elite. Paper was folded into set shapes for ceremonial occasions such as weddings. Serrated strips of white paper were used to mark sacred objects, a custom which can still be seen in every shrine to this day.

Please try and master TSURU while you are in Japan! Why not!?

りす (Squirrel)

smrisu

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